My husband has three chargers plugged into a power board which he often leaves switched on even when the phones are not connected to the chargers. One day I decided to do a little research on the energy usage and found conflicting information. Energy companies say switch them off to save power. People who have tested it with a meter have found that they (and TVs on standby) use very little power and thus make very little difference to your power bill and the only significance would be global if a million people switched off.

Growing up, you probably had a frugal relative who enforced strict limits on how high or low the thermostat could be set. If you don’t have one now, a programmable thermostat can play this role for your home automatically. Based on your family’s schedule, you can program it to automatically set the target temperature higher in the summer and lower in the winter when your family won’t be home.


The schedule mandated working two shifts with many complex crane lifts and rigging maneuvers in order to place the new equipment within the close confines of the work site, all the while maintaining the required close 4mm alignment tolerances necessitated by the GIS equipment specifications.  The project was successfully completed on time and under budget through the fall of 2005 and spring of 2006.
Smart metering programs vary among utility companies, but the basic idea is the same: The utility installs a special “smart” meter that tracks how much electricity you’re using. The utility uses that data to make sure its power grid doesn’t get overloaded and cause blackouts. If the grid nears capacity, the utility can shut off major appliances in homes for short periods of time (such as 15 minutes per hour). Not all companies offer smart metering, but some do and many others are considering it.
Spend time outdoors. Spending a lot of time indoors will naturally lead to higher energy costs because you will be using lights, electronics, and air conditioning. Spending more time outdoors means you can turn off indoor electronics, and in the process, you will have fun going to the beach, the park, the movies, and so on. Turn off all electronics before leaving the house.
A lot of people are looking to save money these days. No one knows what the future holds, and we all know that the world has been marred with economic troubles in the past decade or so. A major household expenditure for most of us is our electric bill. And our electricity usage is a great place to start when we’re looking at how to lower our bills.
We left one on at the TV, but with most things streamed to our video games, we don’t need it, and the other was used as an Internet portal, and stored some common files. We turned it off, and I set up wake on lan (which is actually really cool) to turn it on from any of the other computers. If I wasn’t so lazy, I could definitely live without the wake on lan.
LOL … I like to keep my house at 71 (most especially at night, even with a fan running) but on the hottest days this summer I bumped it up to 75. At 75, I am sweating the second I move to do anything and generally uncomfortable all day. While I’m gone at work, I let it go up to 75 or 76 but I don’t want it to stress trying to get back down when I come home so I don’t go above that. Pretty shocking huh? I should just move to anarctica and be done with it. ;)
One thing about drying clothes in the house – if the house is sealed enough to be energy efficient – you are releasing a lot of moisture into the house. When I lived in Europe, the clothes drying setup tended to be in the attic in older houses (beyond the insulation) or in a basement where casement windows could be opened to vent the moisture. Also, houses without clothes dryers usually have a “pressing closet,” with a bit of heat and moisture to ease any stiffness out of the line-dried clothes. Ours was built around the water heater – probably wouldn’t work with a modern one!
The organization of the electrical sector of a country or region varies depending on the economic system of the country. In some places, all electric power generation, transmission and distribution is provided by a government controlled organization. Other regions have private or investor-owned utility companies, city or municipally owned companies, cooperative companies owned by their own customers, or combinations. Generation, transmission and distribution may be offered by a single company, or different organizations may provide each of these portions of the system.
Dry loads of laundry back-to-back so the dryer doesn’t cool down between loads (a warm dryer uses less energy). And only run the dryer until the clothes are dry. Overdrying damages your clothes and runs up your electric bill. If you’re in the market for a new dryer and already have a gas line in the house, go with a gas dryer. A gas dryer is more efficient.

Dry loads of laundry back-to-back so the dryer doesn’t cool down between loads (a warm dryer uses less energy). And only run the dryer until the clothes are dry. Overdrying damages your clothes and runs up your electric bill. If you’re in the market for a new dryer and already have a gas line in the house, go with a gas dryer. A gas dryer is more efficient.
If you want to keep the cost of electricity even lower, consider investing in your house itself. Many energy companies offer free energy audits, in which an employee will inspect your house and make recommendations. These recommendations commonly include installing fresh weatherstripping around doors and windows and adding insulation. Although you may pay out a sizable chunk of cash retrofitting your home, it will show in a lower electric bill. In some cases, an energy company may even help you pay for energy efficiency measures; other improvements may qualify for a tax credit.
The ENERGY STAR is an accolade given by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to a product that meets the rigorous energy-efficiency guidelines set forth by the U.S. government in order to reduce greenhouse emissions. An ENERGY STAR certified room air conditioner uses about 15% less energy than non-certified models. That 15% could save you around $85 over the unit’s lifetime. To learn more, go to energystar.gov

One option is to look out for fixed and variable rate plans. Most plans are offered in variable rates, but some providers offer a fixed rate over a set period of time. It’s impossible to say how variable rates may rise and fall, but if you look at energy rates over time, you may feel that a fixed rate plan will offer cheaper electricity in the long run.


If you’re looking for which electricity company is the cheapest to save money on annual power prices, the good news is that you have freedom of choice. You can use our accurate electricity comparison service to compare leading electricity suppliers near you to help you find lower rates and potentially reduce energy bills by hundreds of dollars per year.
That said, you don't always have to keep your grill at searing temperatures. Rather, the F21C is nuanced enough to accommodate quite the range of temperatures — specifically, between 250 and 650 degrees Fahrenheit. This is achieved via the Fuego's concentric circle dual ring burner — the outer zone provides indirect heat, which lets you cook low and slow. The inner zone, on the other hand, will give you up to 650 degrees of direct heat for your meats and seafoods.
More good news: well-qualified Amigo Energy customers are never required to pay an electricity deposit. In fact, a lot of our customers qualify for $0 down electricity. Concerned about your credit score? Don’t worry, customers with fair to poor credit can benefit from deposit payment plans that we spread out over a three-month period for your convenience.
No outdoor space would truly be complete without a large patio umbrella, and the Hampton Bay Solar Offset umbrella is perfect for serving a wide range of purposes. With its 11-foot diameter, this handy piece of furniture will provide a much needed break from the hot sun, and will keep you safe from overexposure, while still allowing you to lounge outside.
Electric rates for companies vary greatly by industry and function. Although homes come in all shapes and sizes, businesses have larger variations with diverse needs – from industrial buildings to mom-and-pop businesses. In August, for example, the average business in Indiana paid 10.35 cents per kWh. With this number, we can deduce that on average companies in the state paid about $650 that month for electricity.    
The SCC issued an order in a November 2014 ruling in the company’s biennial review that left base rates unchanged. Based on a review of 2012-2013 earnings, the SCC also required a $5.8 million refund credit to customers over a six-month period beginning in late January 2015. During the 2015 session of the Virginia General Assembly, legislation was approved that will keep Appalachian’s base rates (which comprise about 60 percent of the bill) unchanged until at least 2020.
We also have a new frontloading washing machine, which must save water, (although honestly I haven’t noticed a drop in our water bill), but I suspect it uses more electricity since it takes at least twice as long to clean clothes. We do spend less time drying the clothes as they don’t get nearly as wet (it’s sort of amazing they can be so clean with that little water) so there is definitely some saving in gas for the dryer.
As an energy supplier, Verde Energy offers great residential electricity rates on 100% renewable energy. Our electricity rates are competitive and fixed. We are not a subsidiary of a utility company nor do we rely on a network to increase our sales. Therefore, we can offer competitive electric rates while making it easy for consumers to go green and support renewable energy resources. Verde Energy offers its customers free online energy tools and tips, plus savings on a range of products to improve energy efficiency. Verde Energy is committed to the belief that wiser energy consumption can positively impact both the environment and your wallet. We don’t lure you in with temporary electric rates that spike overnight. Remember, there is no cost to sign up and you can cancel anytime without a cancellation fee. Your local utility company will continue to fully service your account and send you just one monthly bill.

I turn off my heat/air when I leave the house (as long as it isn’t below freezing) and turn it back on when I get home. I usually have the air on 72 and use the ceiling fans when it is over 90 and humid outside. My house is usually 10 degrees cooler due to all the trees (I have several 100+ year old trees outside and about 100 in the backyard) around the house. All my neighbors taught me since they have done this for years even when bills weren’t as high as now. Don’t forget to reduce, reuse and recycle. We need to strive for 95% recycling like Europe.
As a result, the cost to cool our house is getting obscene. We could dial the temp up to 80 degrees, put a kiddie pool in the living room, and buy some Misty Mates from HSN, but I'm not willing to go there. I work from home, and I won't be miserable to save a few bucks. I'm also not going to buy a new refrigerator just to save $72 over the course of a year, install a programmable thermostat when ours works fine, or purchase a new washing machine with energy-efficient motors and pumps. If I needed new appliances, sure, I'd check out energy-efficient models, but ours are all sufficient.
To keep prices competitive, Washington diversifies its energy portfolio. The greatest contributor is hydroelectric power, which generates close to 7,700 gigawatts per hour (GWh) annually. Other significant sources of electricity are nuclear (812 GWh), natural gas (290 GWh) and coal (192 GWh). Renewables, which account for 912 GWh, include wind, solar and geothermal. As a result, the state offers electricity at a 35 percent discount from the national average.
We can also try not to cook that much in the summer. Anyway cooked food is not healthy at all. Also I’ve been always wondering why since it is so hot outside it has be THAT COLD everywhere inside??? The difference between the temperatures is way over normal. Can you imagine how much energy we would save if all the big companies, malls, stores, etc. turn the AC a little bit down?
It's important to make sure the walls and windows of your home aren't leaking air. Just like your refrigerator shouldn't be left open to cool the whole kitchen, your house shouldn't be cooling the yard. Buy a cheap roll of weatherstripping tape, and seal up those doors and windows. Also, make sure to clean the filters on your air conditioning vents at least once a month — this will help your air conditioning be more efficient.
Seventy-five percent of the electrical use by home electronics occurs when they’re turned off, according to the Department of Energy. These “energy vampires” suck electricity all day long—costing you an extra $100 each year. So if you’d like to keep that Ben Franklin in your wallet, unplug your electronics or plug them into a power strip, then turn off the strip.
†Offer is available to Texas residential customers who enroll using the Promotion Code “NIGHTSFREE”. Plan bills a monthly Base Charge, an Energy Charge, and passes through Utility Transmission and Distribution delivery charges. Energy Charges for usage consumed between 9pm and 7am each day is credited back on your bill. The utility charges, including delivery charges for night time hours, are passed through at cost and aggregated on your bill. See Electricity Facts Label for details.
Most of the electricity plans listed above are variable rate plans, meaning the prices you are changed can change at the retailer’s discretion. Some energy providers also offer fixed rate plans, whereby you can lock in competitive prices now with the aim of saving in the long run. Fixed rate plans are usually only offered by the big three power companies. However, EnergyAustralia and AGL are currently the only retailers to offer NSW households a fixed rate deal with their Secure Saver and Essentials plans respectively. In this case, usage and supply rates are locked in for two years, which could prove a financially beneficial move in the long run.
If you only use an electric water heater at certain times of the day, you’re wasting electricity keeping the water hot 24/7. To solve that problem, install an electronic timer switch (Photo 1; sold at home centers). Timers are available for 120- and 240-volt heaters. They can be programmed for daily or weekly schedules so you only heat the water when you need it. A timer can save you $25 per year.
We save money — we’re in the mid-Atlantic– by only airconditioning one or two rooms and using fans in the rest. A side effect is that when you’ve spent most of your time outside air conditioning, you can tolerate higher AC-less temps (assuming you’re reasonably healthy). The more AC you give yourself, the more you need. That also encourages us to use outdoor line drying and run heat-producing appliances at night. :)
“Southern Electric was great for me. They did the wiring in my new home as well as installed a great room ceiling fan (20ft ceilings) a few months later. I purchased the fan through them and when they arrived to install it we realized we had picked the wrong metal to match our house. It was entirely our fault, but Southern Electric swapped it out, no problem, and came back to install the new model a few weeks later. No additional fees.”
On a side note, I find if I am sitting and working at my computer, I can be comfortable at 79 or 80 as long as I have a fan. This is especially true if it is in the nineties outside and the AC constantly on and sucking out the humidity. Since these days I am constantly chasing little kids around the house, I keep it lower, but I don’t think in a hot climate 79 or 80 should be an unthinkable temperature. I personally find it disturbing when the differential between the outside and inside temperature is anything over 20 degrees in the summer. This makes being outside even more unbearable because your body can’t adjust.
If you let that contract expiration slide without acknowledging the renewal offer or enrolling in a different plan, you will be enrolled in what is called a “default product” and these typically have much higher rates than your previous plan. It’s generally a variable rate, month-to-month plan and you will be surprised with a very unpleasant electricity bill. This is standard industry practice and happens with any electricity plan regardless of the initial contract term.
I just had a new HVAC system put in a couple months ago and I had been using one of the expensive cleanable/reusable filters. I thought I was saving money and being green, but my HVAC guy recommended the really cheap filters and frequent changes. Those other filters apparently make the system work harder, especially if it isn’t changed frequently and that damages the system. Our programmable thermostat has a 30 day filter reminder (which is 30 days of use, not 30 calendar days).
Despite the PUCT’s efforts to curtail teaser rates by giving users the ability to filter out minimum usage fees/credits, teaser rates still overwhelm the Power to Choose site to the point it’s easy for customers to be misled on what they’re actually getting. On a recent visit, the first five pages of the default search for our zip code was filled with what we consider to be teaser rates (and that was with bill credit filter on!)
Advertising Disclosure: Some offers on this page may promote affiliates, which means GRS earns a commission if you purchase products or services through the links provided. All opinions expressed here are the author's and not of any other entity. The content at Get Rich Slowly has not been reviewed, approved, or endorsed by any entity mentioned at the site. For additional information, please review our full advertising disclosure.
Many utility companies offering TOU rates allow residential customers to opt into it, but this isn’t always the case. California is the first state to require that everyone who installs a solar panel system has to switch to a TOU rate plan under their net metering 2.0 program. Time-of-use electricity pricing is a common option for commercial buildings as well, especially if tenants have flexibility in when they can use the most electricity.
×