LOL … I like to keep my house at 71 (most especially at night, even with a fan running) but on the hottest days this summer I bumped it up to 75. At 75, I am sweating the second I move to do anything and generally uncomfortable all day. While I’m gone at work, I let it go up to 75 or 76 but I don’t want it to stress trying to get back down when I come home so I don’t go above that. Pretty shocking huh? I should just move to anarctica and be done with it. ;)
As a freelance writer, editor, and blogger, April Dykman specialized in personal finance, real estate, and entrepreneurship topics. Her work has been featured on MSNBC, Fox Business, Forbes, MoneyBuilder, Yahoo! Finance, Lifehacker, and The Consumerist. Now she does direct response copywriting but, in her free time, April is a wannabe chef, a diehard Italophile, and a recovering yogi.
“Southern Electric was great for me. They did the wiring in my new home as well as installed a great room ceiling fan (20ft ceilings) a few months later. I purchased the fan through them and when they arrived to install it we realized we had picked the wrong metal to match our house. It was entirely our fault, but Southern Electric swapped it out, no problem, and came back to install the new model a few weeks later. No additional fees.”
Residents of Kentucky paid an average of 10.47 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) for their electricity in August, one of the lowest rates in the country and well below the U.S. average of 13.30 cents/kWh. However, they use an average of 1,121 kWh per month, well above the U.S. average of 897. That leaves the state with a Choose Energy Price Index score of 101.4, which places it 25th nationally.
Problem is, waiting a long time to change your filter makes your HVAC system less efficient and costs you more in electricity. Dirt and neglect can even cause your expensive HVAC unit to die an untimely death, said Maria Vargas, spokeswoman for the EPA’s Energy Star program. Instead, spend a little more to get a reusable filter than you can simply hose off when it gets clogged up with dust and other particles.
Yes, the big changes cost a lot upfront but they can pay off big in the long run. I don’t know if this is true for appliances but it certainly is for heating and cooling. We had a 20 yr old furnace and AC when we replaced it with a 95% efficient unit this past December. We paid $5,000 after the federal credit. So far we have already saved hundreds and hundreds of dollars, and that is even after we kept the house at a more comfortable temperature in both seasons. If we had stuck with our previous 65 degrees and 79 degrees, we would have saved even more. Yes, we still have years before we make it back, but our house is MUCH more comfortable and with an older unit it could die at any time anyway.
The nature and state of market reform of the electricity market often determines whether electric companies are able to be involved in just some of these processes without having to own the entire infrastructure, or citizens choose which components of infrastructure to patronise. In countries where electricity provision is deregulated, end-users of electricity may opt for more costly green electricity.
As a result, the cost to cool our house is getting obscene. We could dial the temp up to 80 degrees, put a kiddie pool in the living room, and buy some Misty Mates from HSN, but I’m not willing to go there. I work from home, and I won’t be miserable to save a few bucks. I’m also not going to buy a new refrigerator just to save $72 over the course of a year, install a programmable thermostat when ours works fine, or purchase a new washing machine with energy-efficient motors and pumps. If I needed new appliances, sure, I’d check out energy-efficient models, but ours are all sufficient.
A few other people mentioned that 80 degrees is not an unreasonable thermostat setting. We keep ours set at 80 during the day, and as long as we have a few fans to circulate the air and we wear shorts, it’s perfectly fine. What I don’t like is going to someone’s house where they keep it so cool that you can’t even wear summer clothing like t-shirts and shorts without freezing. At night, we turn it down to 74. That’s about as warm as we can keep it and still sleep comfortably. We also turn it to 76 or 77 if we have company.
Go retro with a crock pot. Speaking of ovens, there's nothing that heats up our house faster than a preheating oven and a few pans on the stove top. Slow cookers, on the other hand, use less energy and won't turn your kitchen into, well, an oven. I think the crock pot often gets a bad rap thanks to the old way of slow cooking: bland recipes created from canned and prepackaged ingredients. But the slow cooker is enjoying a quiet revival, and with it we're seeing better recipes, such as this pulled-pork sandwich and these triple chocolate brownies.

When you need residential electrical services in Ashburn, Kolb is here to help! Whether you want to install new light fixtures, need a major upgrade to your circuit panel system, or are interested in an energy saving consultation, our licensed and fully trained electricians are ready to assist you, ensuring all wiring is done safely and properly to the latest electrical code standards.


It’s a good idea to compare the current rate you’re paying for electricity, including both supply and delivery, to what the rates are under a time-of-use plan. Is off-peak pricing a significantly cheaper rate than you’re paying currently? If the rates are similar, you may not save much by opting into a time-of-use plan, even if you change your behavior.
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