Switching electricity supplier could shave pounds off your bills. But it’s not always about how much hard cash you could save. You might be fed up with poor customer service, you might want greater visibility of your usage through an app or you might want to choose your supplier based on their green credentials, or whether they supply a smart meter.

The price for electricity can vary from day to day and even by hour. You can find out when electricity is cheaper by examining the energy market. When consumer demand for energy is low, you will see the best energy prices. Seasonally, this falls during the spring and fall months when temperatures are mild. During summer and winter, energy use increases due to heating and cooling needs, causing higher electricity rates.
All of these tasks should add up to noticeable savings and don’t require much time or money. (Fingers crossed that ceiling fan will be an easy fix!) Once I’ve taken these steps, maybe I’ll be ready for more. For now, it’s much too hot to think about new appliances, insulation, and replacing windows. Besides, I’ve got triple chocolate brownies to bake.
**Install a hot water heater timer with temperature controls. **Hot water heater timers are designed to schedule when to supply hot water to your home. This helps limit your consumption of hot water, and it could save you upwards of $200 a year if you decrease the temperature of your hot water as it is released. If you rent or live in an apartment building, ask your landlord if they use one and if they would be open to it.

Perhaps my favorite aspect of the HiSense is how little noise it makes. While I certainly want an air conditioner in my home, I don't want to know that it's there — to that end, the quiet compressor and the cross-flow fan design results in a strong yet quiet airflow. If you have the fan set at its lowest level, you'll barely hear the unit. To get technical, it only reaches 47 dB(A) at this setting — for reference, libraries generally have a noise level of 40 dB(A).
At the very least, the programmable thermostat could be set to ease back the throttle at night when no one is awake. That’s what we do at our house, since my wife is home with the kids all day. The thermostat is set to kick up to 80 or so overnight in the summer, then drop back down to a more normal temperature shortly before everyone is up for the day. Gives 6-8 hours a day at the more energy-saving temperature, without much of a sacrifice in comfort. And in the winter, everyone has more than enough blankets to keep warm without the furnace blasting constantly, so it’s even less of an inconvenience.
The SCC issued an order in a November 2014 ruling in the company’s biennial review that left base rates unchanged. Based on a review of 2012-2013 earnings, the SCC also required a $5.8 million refund credit to customers over a six-month period beginning in late January 2015. During the 2015 session of the Virginia General Assembly, legislation was approved that will keep Appalachian’s base rates (which comprise about 60 percent of the bill) unchanged until at least 2020.
A utility bill usually includes electricity, water, and gas charges. Some states also combine these with sewage and garbage, so be sure to check your bill to see exactly what it includes. A utility bill will show the breakdown of energy and power used to keep the water running, the lights on, and the heater operating. The bills usually come once a month and generally it do not include things like internet, cable, or rent.
Install ceiling fans. Yes, lowering your temperature in the winter and increasing it in the summer helps reduce your energy use via temperature change. However, ceiling fans can help distribute the air that may have risen to the ceilings of your home. The popular belief is that fans actually make the home cooler. However, fans simply help move the hot or cold air towards you.

Solar panels can lead to thousands of dollars in electricity savings over the course of 30 years, because you’re generating your own power instead of buying it all from your utility. If you have time-of-use rates, the credits you get for sending excess solar electricity back to the grid will depend on the time of day. If your solar panels are producing lots of electricity at peak hours, you’ll receive credits at the peak hour rate, which you can use later on. However, that also means that you’ll be credited at the lower rate for electricity you send back during off peak hours.
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