There are over 60 different energy suppliers competing for your business on any given day in Texas. Many of these electric companies have websites that are confusing and nearly impossible to navigate, their rates and fees hidden by dense industry jargon and misleading advertising. Who has the spare the time to sort through the choices spread out over all these different sites and companies?
Here’s what I did: 1. add insulation to the attic (I live in Houston). Cost $300 after federal subsidy for a 2200 square foot house (I added R-30 for a total of R-50, really thick and fluffy in the attic!). 2. add ridge vent on the attic to increase air flow in the attic and lower the attic temperature. 3. add soffit vents (in my case I quadrupled them). Increases air flow in attic (my attic temperature on a summer afternoon went from 130 degrees to 114 degrees, lowering the heat transfer into the house and lowering the time the AC had to run, equalling big money. 4. the above changes lowered my electricity bill 40% in summer, which lasts five full months in Houston. 5. shop electricity rates if you live in a deregulated electricity market. Prices range over a 40% swing, so it’s easy to save. 6. Don’t overly sweat the small stuff; try a Kill-a-Watt meter and find out how much your electronics really use. I was shocked at how little my refrigerator really used (and the advice to keep the freezer full? I tried it and over a week there was zero difference in the Kill-a-Watt reading). 7. Get an efficient AC unit. I installed a unit with a 15 SEER rating. It runs a lot but is very efficient based on my electricity bill.

Overwhelmed by all those charges on your electric bill? Confused by the crafty contract jargon? The Truly Fixed Plan bundles your electric costs and pricing, including Transmission and Distribution Service Provider (TDSP) charges, into one rate. Not only does this simplify your electricity bill, but it also makes predicting future utility costs easier than ever.
Despite the PUCT’s efforts to curtail teaser rates by giving users the ability to filter out minimum usage fees/credits, teaser rates still overwhelm the Power to Choose site to the point it’s easy for customers to be misled on what they’re actually getting. On a recent visit, the first five pages of the default search for our zip code was filled with what we consider to be teaser rates (and that was with bill credit filter on!)
One option is to look out for fixed and variable rate plans. Most plans are offered in variable rates, but some providers offer a fixed rate over a set period of time. It’s impossible to say how variable rates may rise and fall, but if you look at energy rates over time, you may feel that a fixed rate plan will offer cheaper electricity in the long run.

Adjust your furniture to improve cooling efficiency. Sometimes your sofa is directly under or covering an air duct. Rearranging your furniture so it is in the ideal position for airflow will help lower your electric bill. When you cannot feel the air coming out of a vent, you will change the temperature on your thermostat unnecessarily. Moving the furniture from the vent will help prevent excess energy use and cut your monthly costs. 


This tiny little personal AC unit (and I do mean tiny) packs quite a punch considering its diminutive size. It measures just 7.24 by 8.54 by 8.14 inches, but boasts a cooling power of up to 1360 BTU, and claims to keep an area of about 43 square feet relatively cool. And while I was quite skeptical about what a cube the size of a large jewelry box could really do, I was, in a word, impressed.
The first comment said to use heat causing appliances at night when the temperatures are cooler outside. That may be true & I’ve done that for my own comfort. It may not save money thought because it’s my understanding that power companies charge different rates for electrical power at different times of the day, afternoon & night being the most expensive. 3am until about 10am would probably be cheaper. I might not want to vacuum but the delay setting on your dishwasher would work at that time.
I have a question on programable thermostats. We have one and have it set to be 6-10 degrees warmer when we are gone during the work days than when we are there. At what point do you lose your savings from not running the AC as much while you are out versus running it like crazy to resume the cooler temp when you are there? It seems like the AC works extra hard to get it cooled off- do we have the temp set too high while we are gone(maybe should only have 4-5 degrees warmer while we are at work)? Are we losing our efficiency?
In order to comply with new federally mandated regulations passed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the decision was made to shut down coal-fired power stations in West Virginia. Additional work on existing infrastructure was required to maintain service to area customers. The work included to be performed was awarded to New River Electrical under our existing blanket contract with AEP. This work included the Mountaineer, Sporn, and Kanawha River Substations.
One of the things that consumes a lot of power is a freezer running in an uncooled garage, storage room, etc. I used to beg my mom to disconnect hers (she lived alone and really didn’t need the extra freezer space) but she was a tough cookie when it came to changing her ways. Also, make sure your cooling system’s duct work is intact and not leaking cooled air into your attic. Consider turning off your electric water heater when you leave home for a week or more.
When you buy a new refrigerator, consider letting the delivery folks cart away the old one rather than keeping it for those "in case" times. It will cost you about $100 to $150 a year to run—or more if it's an older model. If you can't live without a second unit, put it in the basement rather than in the garage. That's because a basement is generally cooler; the fridge won't have to work so hard.
South Australians pay some of the highest electricity bills in the country3. The industry was deregulated in 2013 and there’s competition among energy suppliers in SA – many offer discounts during your first 12 months. If you live in SA, it’s important to compare against other plans every once in a while to make the most of the discounts offered on cheap electricity.
HPSEBL Quick Pay is the easiest and smartest way to pay your electricity bills online anytime, anywhere. What makes Quick Pay so convenient , is that it doesn't need any registration !!! So do away with writing cheques or standing in queues to pay all your electricity bills. Make all your bill payments from the convenience of your home/office with Quick Pay
How does that work? Texas Energy buys electricity and competes in the market for the best price -- a competition that ultimately drives prices down and allows us to deliver more value for your money. In Texas, switching to a different electricity provider is kind of like changing to a different long distance company. When you switch to Spark Energy, the utility will continue to deliver electricity to your home but Spark Energy will handle all the billing, including the utility’s delivery fees and the electricity you actually use.
Based on the cents per kWh usage costs and daily supply charges of the energy companies in this review, plus average energy consumption statistics from the Australian Energy Regulator, we can show households that are connected to the Ausgrid network in Sydney and the surrounding areas (including Newcastle and the Central Coast) where they can find the cheapest electricity prices. The Ausgrid network covers large parts of inner, northern and eastern metropolitan Sydney, plus other surrounding areas. Costs for other distribution networks of NSW may differ slightly.
If you want to keep the cost of electricity even lower, consider investing in your house itself. Many energy companies offer free energy audits, in which an employee will inspect your house and make recommendations. These recommendations commonly include installing fresh weatherstripping around doors and windows and adding insulation. Although you may pay out a sizable chunk of cash retrofitting your home, it will show in a lower electric bill. In some cases, an energy company may even help you pay for energy efficiency measures; other improvements may qualify for a tax credit.
Go retro with a crock pot. Speaking of ovens, there's nothing that heats up our house faster than a preheating oven and a few pans on the stove top. Slow cookers, on the other hand, use less energy and won't turn your kitchen into, well, an oven. I think the crock pot often gets a bad rap thanks to the old way of slow cooking: bland recipes created from canned and prepackaged ingredients. But the slow cooker is enjoying a quiet revival, and with it we're seeing better recipes, such as this pulled-pork sandwich and these triple chocolate brownies.

Texas has undoubtedly been the most successful US electricity deregulation market for residents. A lot of it’s success comes from the Texas Public Utility Commission’s (PUCT) marketing efforts when it launched PowerToChoose.org. Originally known as Texas Electric Choice, today’s Power To Choose site is still very popular for Texas residential electricity shopping, but it’s issues have also come under increasing scrutiny due to rate confusion and misleading electricity plans.
Prices for any single class of electricity customer can vary by time-of-day called TOU or time of use or by the capacity or nature of the supply circuit (e.g., 5 kW, 12 kW, 18 kW, 24 kW are typical in some of the large developed countries); for industrial customers, single-phase vs. 3-phase, etc. Prices are usually highest for commercial and residential consumers because of the additional costs associated with stepping down their distribution voltage. The price of power for industrial customers is relatively the same as the wholesale price of electricity, because they consume more power at higher voltages. Supplying electricity at transmission-level high voltages is more efficient, and therefore less expensive.
When you bundle an electricity product with a natural gas and/or home warranty product, you save! Every product you bundle lowers your electricity rate with IGS Energy. Just make sure you stick with us to keep your bundled rate. Should you cancel any of your bundled products, the associated discount will be removed from your electricity supply rate. Enter your zip code below to bundle and save!
Many utility companies offer more than one time-of-use policies. These plans may have different hours classified as peak hours, or may even include some “partial-peak” hours that charge less than peak rates, but more than off-peak rates. Many rates will depend not only on the hour that you’re using electricity, but also the season. Summer rates are often higher than winter rates because of energy-intensive air conditioning systems running during hot days. You might also have a plan that has lower peak rates, or fewer peak hours, on the weekends.
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