Switching electricity supplier could shave pounds off your bills. But it’s not always about how much hard cash you could save. You might be fed up with poor customer service, you might want greater visibility of your usage through an app or you might want to choose your supplier based on their green credentials, or whether they supply a smart meter.
General Disclaimer: Get Rich Slowly is an independent website managed by J.D. Roth, who is not a trained financial expert. His knowledge comes from the school of hard knocks. He does his best to provide accurate, useful info, but makes no guarantee that all readers will achieve the same level of success. If you have questions, consult a trained professional.

Programmable thermostats are great, but are useless if someone is home all day. The main point is to set the temperature at an energy-saving setting when noone is home; however, the author is home all day so I can see her point. Also, we installed a programmable thermostat. I do love it and all the settings, but it is currently useless to us since one of us is home all day long; there’s no reason to program it right now.
Raising your refrigerator temperature by a few degrees can save you hundreds of dollars a year. The fresh food section of your fridge only needs to be at 36-38 degrees Fahrenheit, and many times fridges are programmed at two to five degrees lower than necessary. As for your freezer compartment, you only need to set it to between zero and negative five degrees Fahrenheit.
When it comes to the electricity itself, there is no difference at all. A cheap electric supply is the same electricity, it's simply provided by a new supplier (unless you opt for green energy - more on that here). As suppliers buy and generate different sets of energy they also have different prices. What's more, you might be on a tariff that is simply more expensive, such as a standard tariff. If you decide to switch electricity don't equate a lower price with worse service.
Keep the thermostat as cool as you comfortably can during the winter. You should also acquire a programmable thermostat, if you don't already have one, and set the temperature lower at night. Not only will this lower your electric bill, it will also help you sleep, since cooler temperatures promote healthy sleep. Close off rooms you do not use frequently as well, rather than trying to keep them at the same temperature as the rest of the house.
If the $259 price tag is a bit too steep, Evapolar also offers another cheaper model of its portable AC unit for $199. Called the evaLight, it's very similar to its newer, more powerful sibling, but has a bit less cooling power (1200 BTU), and can only cool about 32 square feet. It's also a touch smaller, measuring 6.87 × 6.70 × 6. 69 inches, and is just under three pounds without water.
LOL … I like to keep my house at 71 (most especially at night, even with a fan running) but on the hottest days this summer I bumped it up to 75. At 75, I am sweating the second I move to do anything and generally uncomfortable all day. While I’m gone at work, I let it go up to 75 or 76 but I don’t want it to stress trying to get back down when I come home so I don’t go above that. Pretty shocking huh? I should just move to anarctica and be done with it. ;)
Closing the curtains and lowering the blinds on the sunny side of your house will help keep you cooler on hot days. If you don't want to obstruct the view, consider applying window film to the glass. Both the do-it-yourself cut-and-stick type and the professionally applied films will reduce radiant heat while allowing you to see through them. Similarly, the Rocky Mountain Institute suggests using outdoor awnings and, if you live in an area that is warm all year round, even painting your house a light color to reflect heat away.

A shocking 75 percent of the energy used by home electronics is consumed when they're turned off. These "phantom" users include televisions, DVD players, stereos, computers and many kitchen appliances—basically anything that holds a time or other settings. A simple solution? Plug all of these items into power strips; then, get in the habit of turning off the strips between uses.

Use fans instead of air conditioning. Circulation is important to using less air conditioning during the summer. Cool down the house early in the morning by placing a box fan in the window and opening up another window at the opposite end of the house, in addition to turning on ceiling fans. Box fans sit perfectly in most windows and help cool air come inside.


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Use fans instead of air conditioning. Circulation is important to using less air conditioning during the summer. Cool down the house early in the morning by placing a box fan in the window and opening up another window at the opposite end of the house, in addition to turning on ceiling fans. Box fans sit perfectly in most windows and help cool air come inside.

Zachary Shahan Zach is tryin' to help society help itself (and other species). He spends most of his time here on CleanTechnica as its director and chief editor. He's also the president of Important Media and the director/founder of EV Obsession and Solar Love. Zach is recognized globally as an electric vehicle, solar energy, and energy storage expert. He has presented about cleantech at conferences in India, the UAE, Ukraine, Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, the USA, and Canada. Zach has long-term investments in TSLA, FSLR, SPWR, SEDG, & ABB — after years of covering solar and EVs, he simply has a lot of faith in these particular companies and feels like they are good cleantech companies to invest in. But he offers no professional investment advice and would rather not be responsible for you losing money, so don't jump to conclusions.
This tiny little personal AC unit (and I do mean tiny) packs quite a punch considering its diminutive size. It measures just 7.24 by 8.54 by 8.14 inches, but boasts a cooling power of up to 1360 BTU, and claims to keep an area of about 43 square feet relatively cool. And while I was quite skeptical about what a cube the size of a large jewelry box could really do, I was, in a word, impressed.
I’m going to go ahead and start with the most obvious — the most effective way to lower your electric bill is very likely by going solar. Sure, you have to pay for those solar panels, but they are cheaper (in the long run) than electricity. The average household that goes solar is likely to save tens of thousands of dollars over the course of their solar panel system’s lifetime.
Kevin, wow where do you buy your air filters?? Buy cheap and change monthly or quarterly depending on how dirty they get. I’m an ac service tech and a 30$ filter is probably much tighter than is necessary for good filtration and more than likely the high duct static created by such a tight filter would cause the blower to suck unfiltered air through any unsealed openings in the duct system (doors, electrical knockouts etc…) buy a cheap pleated 1″ filter ($4) and change it often
I used this method, and with a programmable thermostat for my central air and heat, I was able to lower my bill to about $75. The only exception to this was I left my lamps plugged in. Everything else was unplugged as soon as I was done with it. Of course, I worked all day and no one was at home, either, but before I started, my bill ran around $125.

As a freelance writer, editor, and blogger, April Dykman specialized in personal finance, real estate, and entrepreneurship topics. Her work has been featured on MSNBC, Fox Business, Forbes, MoneyBuilder, Yahoo! Finance, Lifehacker, and The Consumerist. Now she does direct response copywriting but, in her free time, April is a wannabe chef, a diehard Italophile, and a recovering yogi.


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I’m going to go ahead and start with the most obvious — the most effective way to lower your electric bill is very likely by going solar. Sure, you have to pay for those solar panels, but they are cheaper (in the long run) than electricity. The average household that goes solar is likely to save tens of thousands of dollars over the course of their solar panel system’s lifetime.

We save money — we’re in the mid-Atlantic– by only airconditioning one or two rooms and using fans in the rest. A side effect is that when you’ve spent most of your time outside air conditioning, you can tolerate higher AC-less temps (assuming you’re reasonably healthy). The more AC you give yourself, the more you need. That also encourages us to use outdoor line drying and run heat-producing appliances at night. :)
Many utility companies offering TOU rates allow residential customers to opt into it, but this isn’t always the case. California is the first state to require that everyone who installs a solar panel system has to switch to a TOU rate plan under their net metering 2.0 program. Time-of-use electricity pricing is a common option for commercial buildings as well, especially if tenants have flexibility in when they can use the most electricity.
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