If you're lucky enough to have a ceiling fan, running it in the correct direction makes this easy. When it's hot, the fan should spin counter-clockwise to push the hot air up and out. When the weather turns cold, instead spin the fans clockwise to trap heat inside. You'll often find a switch on your ceiling fan to choose a direction, so consult your fan's manual to find out where it is.

**Install a hot water heater timer with temperature controls. **Hot water heater timers are designed to schedule when to supply hot water to your home. This helps limit your consumption of hot water, and it could save you upwards of $200 a year if you decrease the temperature of your hot water as it is released. If you rent or live in an apartment building, ask your landlord if they use one and if they would be open to it.


Texas has undoubtedly been the most successful US electricity deregulation market for residents. A lot of it’s success comes from the Texas Public Utility Commission’s (PUCT) marketing efforts when it launched PowerToChoose.org. Originally known as Texas Electric Choice, today’s Power To Choose site is still very popular for Texas residential electricity shopping, but it’s issues have also come under increasing scrutiny due to rate confusion and misleading electricity plans.
Dallas area residents now have the option for choosing their electric provider. However, with all of the different plans that are available, it can be difficult to make the right decision for your particular electricity needs. You may find yourself overwhelmed by the number of options presented to you by all the electric company advertisements or concerned about shady marketing gimmicks.
Air-dry clothing. I like this idea in theory. J.D.'s wife Kris credits line-drying her laundry with reducing their average daily electricity cost from $2.50 to $1.85. I've yet to try it because I'm concerned about allergens in the air getting into our clothing, and here it's always allergy season. But if you have the room to spare, you could dry clothing inside on hangers. We've enough space in our laundry room to hang quite a bit of clothing, so I'll start air-drying more.
According to the EIA, the average American household uses 897 kWh of energy per month. Knowing that number, and how your own home’s usage compares, provides insight into the amount of energy you use per device. Our Energy Estimator will show you why simple changes like programming your thermostat or turning off televisions and computers when not in use will help lower energy costs.
Although electricity prices in the aren't cheap some countries have it much worse. In this article I'm going compare internationally to look at who is paying more $/kWh for their energy. I’ve gathered some numbers and crunched a little data to see who is really paying a lot for their power. For my neighbour here in the USA I’ll add a bit more data at the end.
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