A shocking 75 percent of the energy used by home electronics is consumed when they're turned off. These "phantom" users include televisions, DVD players, stereos, computers and many kitchen appliances—basically anything that holds a time or other settings. A simple solution? Plug all of these items into power strips; then, get in the habit of turning off the strips between uses.

With four air speed settings and a 6-foot-long power cord, this fan is truly versatile. If you're looking to keep down the noise, this is a great option, too. When placed at its lowest power setting, it's practically silent. And although it'll make a bit of noise if you turn it up to its most powerful level, it'll also bring you the cooling power you need without having to turn to your AC.

We should probably back up first and explain Texas’ electricity rate structure. Texas is the only deregulated state to quote three rates for each plan. See our post for more details about why Texas has three electricity rates. The initial intent for requiring the three rates was to give electricity shoppers a best guess on what their actual rate would be for specific common usage levels (500, 1000, and 2000 kWh). However, this three rate pricing structure is gamed by some electricity providers in order for their plans to appear first on the Power To Choose plan search page as well as other comparison shopping sites. This ‘gaming’ of electricity rates is what we consider to be teaser rates.
Keep your thermostat at a level temperature. Make sure to increase your thermostat temperature during cooler seasons, and decrease in warmer seasons. The general rule is to turn your thermostat back about 7°-10°F from what you would normally set it at in that season for 8 hours a day. This way you can reduce your energy use enough to save upwards of 10 percent a year on heating and cooling. You can simply change the temperature before you leave for work.
Through this project, an additional 600 megawatts of electricity was delivered to southwest Connecticut and the surrounding region. This became a landmark project for the conservative U.S. market. The 345kV XLPE circuit was one of the first U.S. installations of 345kV solid-dielectric cables installed in a duct bank with splices. It was also the longest length installed at the time. This 2.1 parallel circuit demonstrated the viability and reliability of extra high voltage technology and paved the way for future extra high voltage projects.
The average home in the U.S. consumes 897 kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity per month. Bills vary by state and region, as cost per kWh differs. To estimate average energy bills, multiply the average home’s electricity usage (897 kWh) by the cost per kWh in your state for that month. For example, the average cost per kWh in August for Maryland homes was 13.06 cents, which amounts to an average bill of about $117.15 (13.06 cents x 897 kWh) that month.

When you are shopping for a printer, scanner or other computer peripherals, spend a few extra bucks to buy one that will automatically go into "sleep mode" or turn off when it isn't being used. On the other hand, be selective about which devices you really want with "instant on" convenience (like your television set), because they continuously draw electricity.


Prices for any single class of electricity customer can vary by time-of-day called TOU or time of use or by the capacity or nature of the supply circuit (e.g., 5 kW, 12 kW, 18 kW, 24 kW are typical in some of the large developed countries); for industrial customers, single-phase vs. 3-phase, etc. Prices are usually highest for commercial and residential consumers because of the additional costs associated with stepping down their distribution voltage. The price of power for industrial customers is relatively the same as the wholesale price of electricity, because they consume more power at higher voltages. Supplying electricity at transmission-level high voltages is more efficient, and therefore less expensive.
Don’t be drawn in by the electricity rate anomalies that tiered rate plans create and sign up for a plan that likely also has a steep cancellation fee that could leave you in a bind. Educate yourself about your energy usage and do your homework on these plans to make sure you’re getting what you expect, or just don’t be tempted because there are a lot of other more straightforward, fair-priced plans available.

Spend time outdoors. Spending a lot of time indoors will naturally lead to higher energy costs because you will be using lights, electronics, and air conditioning. Spending more time outdoors means you can turn off indoor electronics, and in the process, you will have fun going to the beach, the park, the movies, and so on. Turn off all electronics before leaving the house.
All of these tasks should add up to noticeable savings and don't require much time or money. (Fingers crossed that ceiling fan will be an easy fix!) Once I've taken these steps, maybe I'll be ready for more. For now, it's much too hot to think about new appliances, insulation, and replacing windows. Besides, I've got triple chocolate brownies to bake.
†Offer is available to Texas residential customers who enroll using the Promotion Code “NIGHTSFREE”. Plan bills a monthly Base Charge, an Energy Charge, and passes through Utility Transmission and Distribution delivery charges. Energy Charges for usage consumed between 9pm and 7am each day is credited back on your bill. The utility charges, including delivery charges for night time hours, are passed through at cost and aggregated on your bill. See Electricity Facts Label for details.
Landsvirkun, Iceland’s national power company, offers electricity to buyers for as low as $0.043 per kWh, which is nearly on par with what can be found in Washington State. Coupled with 20% corporate tax, the nation’s low energy prices have attracted not just data centers, methanol producers, silicon metal producers but also aluminum companies—which, again, consume massive amounts of electricity.
A few other people mentioned that 80 degrees is not an unreasonable thermostat setting. We keep ours set at 80 during the day, and as long as we have a few fans to circulate the air and we wear shorts, it’s perfectly fine. What I don’t like is going to someone’s house where they keep it so cool that you can’t even wear summer clothing like t-shirts and shorts without freezing. At night, we turn it down to 74. That’s about as warm as we can keep it and still sleep comfortably. We also turn it to 76 or 77 if we have company.
There are over 60 different energy suppliers competing for your business on any given day in Texas. Many of these electric companies have websites that are confusing and nearly impossible to navigate, their rates and fees hidden by dense industry jargon and misleading advertising. Who has the spare the time to sort through the choices spread out over all these different sites and companies?
As your current bulbs burn out, replace them with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) or LED bulbs. Personally – I don't like the light from CFL's, so I'm trying to buy LED's as my current light bulbs die… and they're MUCH cheaper than they used to be! Check out this 6-pack on Amazon! And it's nice to know I can go another decade or so before I have to replace them again.
We have a child with serious breathing issues, and the $30 filters were recommended to us also. Try using the cheaper filters, and covering the inside of the vents with cheese cloth. It will do a better job of filtering the air, and cheese cloth is cheap. And you can switch it out more frequently in the rooms that concern you most (like the bedroom).
I used this method, and with a programmable thermostat for my central air and heat, I was able to lower my bill to about $75. The only exception to this was I left my lamps plugged in. Everything else was unplugged as soon as I was done with it. Of course, I worked all day and no one was at home, either, but before I started, my bill ran around $125.

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Whether you’re considering time-of-use plans or not, going solar will help you save money on electricity. The EnergySage Solar Marketplace makes it as easy as possible to compare solar pricing from a variety of installers in your local market. Alternatively, if you want to start investigating solar with some estimates of what it may cost and save you in electricity bills overtime, check out our Solar Calculator.
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