If you let that contract expiration slide without acknowledging the renewal offer or enrolling in a different plan, you will be enrolled in what is called a “default product” and these typically have much higher rates than your previous plan. It’s generally a variable rate, month-to-month plan and you will be surprised with a very unpleasant electricity bill. This is standard industry practice and happens with any electricity plan regardless of the initial contract term.
**Use door draft guards **in all entryways. Covering any leakage points in entryways where heating or cooling can escape is extremely important in energy conservation. Revolving doors retain heat eight times better than swinging doors, which helps lower your electricity bill exponentially. Keeping air inside a space is extremely vital when saving money, so make sure to plug all potential leakage areas during all seasons.

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I’m going to go ahead and start with the most obvious — the most effective way to lower your electric bill is very likely by going solar. Sure, you have to pay for those solar panels, but they are cheaper (in the long run) than electricity. The average household that goes solar is likely to save tens of thousands of dollars over the course of their solar panel system’s lifetime.

Dallas area residents now have the option for choosing their electric provider. However, with all of the different plans that are available, it can be difficult to make the right decision for your particular electricity needs. You may find yourself overwhelmed by the number of options presented to you by all the electric company advertisements or concerned about shady marketing gimmicks.


As a result, the cost to cool our house is getting obscene. We could dial the temp up to 80 degrees, put a kiddie pool in the living room, and buy some Misty Mates from HSN, but I’m not willing to go there. I work from home, and I won’t be miserable to save a few bucks. I’m also not going to buy a new refrigerator just to save $72 over the course of a year, install a programmable thermostat when ours works fine, or purchase a new washing machine with energy-efficient motors and pumps. If I needed new appliances, sure, I’d check out energy-efficient models, but ours are all sufficient.

I found a decent pair for $15 at Burlington Coat Factory and pinned them over a sliding door that lets lots of light into my house. (I’ll hang them properly…..eventually. )Granted they made the house darker, but as my house sits empty when I’m at work or out, that doesn’t bother me. And the difference they make to keeping the house cool is significant.
Closing the curtains and lowering the blinds on the sunny side of your house will help keep you cooler on hot days. If you don't want to obstruct the view, consider applying window film to the glass. Both the do-it-yourself cut-and-stick type and the professionally applied films will reduce radiant heat while allowing you to see through them. Similarly, the Rocky Mountain Institute suggests using outdoor awnings and, if you live in an area that is warm all year round, even painting your house a light color to reflect heat away.

Other riders or surcharges on a customer’s bill—called Rate Adjustment Clauses or RACs—are used, for example, to recover costs for fuel to generate power and expenses for mandated environmental or transmission improvements. These charges are reviewed annually by the SCC. These RACs provide no profit for the company. In early 2015, the elimination of several RAC balances lowered the average customer’s bill by about 4 percent.
Excessive Total Harmonic Distortions (THD) and not unity Power Factor (PF) is costly at every level of the electricity market. Cost of PF and THD impact is difficult to estimate, but both can potentially cause heat, vibrations, malfunctioning and even meltdowns. Power factor is the ratio of real to apparent power in a power system. Drawing more current results in a lower power factor. Larger currents require costlier infrastructure to minimize power loss, so consumers with low power factors get charged a higher electricity rate by their utility.[130] True power factor is made of displacement power factor and THD. Power quality is typically monitored at the transmission level. A spectrum of compensation devices[131] mitigate bad outcomes, but improvements can be achieved only with real-time correction devices (old style switching type,[132] modern low-speed DSP driven[133] and near real-time[134]). Most modern devices reduce problems, while maintaining return on investment and significant reduction of ground currents. Power quality problems can cause erroneous responses from many kinds of analog and digital equipment, where the response could be unpredictable.
If you have TOU rates, you can lower your electric bills by waiting for the cheapest time of day to use electricity before you run a clothes dryer, start the dishwasher, or charge your electric car. These off-peak hours are usually at nighttime but depend on your utility’s specific plan. Utilities offer TOU plans to reduce demand on the electric grid by motivating their customers to reduce electricity use during peak hours.
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