With the exception of electric kettles, which are easily replaced by boiling water on the stove, reducing energy consumption with electronics requires actually turning them off. When you have tons of devices and appliances, shutting them off regularly gets annoying. The easiest solution? Stick everything you can on a power strip and turn off the power strip. Chances are you have a few of those around the house already so you won't need to buy them. In the case of computers, even letting them sleep can draw a decent amount of power, so you should shut them off completely. To avoid the nuisance of turning them on and off, simply schedule your startup and shutdown times so the computer handles the task automatically.
Lighting retrofit projects have become increasingly popular because of the energy savings they can generate. Count on Graybar for the most the up-to-date products, knowledge and training for your commercial and industrial lighting needs. An experienced commercial lighting supplier like Graybar makes a lighting retrofit project easy. We have the experience and established relationships with manufacturers and integrators to complete your project on time, on budget and with minimal disruption to your business. We do the work, so you don’t have to.

In one townhouse that I rented, I had an attic with permanent walk-up stairs, and the attic was pretty big. I hammered some nails into the cross-beams and got a clothesline from a hardware store. It was the PERFECT place to dry clothes in warmer months, especially since I didn’t have a washer or dryer anyway so this method saved me lots of quarters at the laundromat!

If you’re looking for a new electricity deal, you’re not alone: 319,000 electricity customers switched energy supplier during January 2018, according to OFGEM*. Shopping around for the best electricity deal is simpler than you might think – but there are bound to be a few questions. Here’s everything you ever wanted to know about comparing electricity deals.


A shocking 75 percent of the energy used by home electronics is consumed when they're turned off. These "phantom" users include televisions, DVD players, stereos, computers and many kitchen appliances—basically anything that holds a time or other settings. A simple solution? Plug all of these items into power strips; then, get in the habit of turning off the strips between uses.


Trapping the right temperature in your home often requires little more than good airflow. Unless you have a very small living space, even central air and heat can have a tough time keeping each room at the same, steady temperature. If you remember that heat rises, you already know how to fix this problem. When it's hot, the heat will escape through the higher parts of your home (whether that means the ceiling or another floor). You want to help it out faster by pushing the air upwards. When it's cold, you don't want that heat to escape so you need to push it back down. Fans make both tasks easily achievable.
Kevin, wow where do you buy your air filters?? Buy cheap and change monthly or quarterly depending on how dirty they get. I’m an ac service tech and a 30$ filter is probably much tighter than is necessary for good filtration and more than likely the high duct static created by such a tight filter would cause the blower to suck unfiltered air through any unsealed openings in the duct system (doors, electrical knockouts etc…) buy a cheap pleated 1″ filter ($4) and change it often
Many utility companies offer more than one time-of-use policies. These plans may have different hours classified as peak hours, or may even include some “partial-peak” hours that charge less than peak rates, but more than off-peak rates. Many rates will depend not only on the hour that you’re using electricity, but also the season. Summer rates are often higher than winter rates because of energy-intensive air conditioning systems running during hot days. You might also have a plan that has lower peak rates, or fewer peak hours, on the weekends.
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