We ordered blackout blinds from a home improvement store and they seem to have helped. We needed them for a third “bedroom” (what a joke) that is 6 feet wide and maybe 10 feet long; this room currently houses 2 laptops and my heat-generating desktop computer. We tried to install a very small ceiling fan in that room, but quickly discovered that the ceiling supports were not designed to hold the weight of a fan. So, the blackout blinds (and keeping my computer off when not in use) seem to help. That room has gotten to 83 degrees in the summer before we put in the blinds.
Our interactive map shows you the latest available residential retail utility rates for each state across the United States, and by how much they increased on average, each year during the period between 2005 and 2017, otherwise known as the escalation rate. This map of electricity rates can help you assess whether you want to mitigate against the risk of increasing rates by investing in solar panels.
You can save a lot of valuable time by paying your electricity bill online with FreeCharge. You could be socialising with friends, sitting in an office meeting, or simply relaxing at home; just pick up your mobile or laptop, fill your basic information, and pay your bill in a snap! You get an option to save your transaction details. This means you do not have to re-enter information every time you have to pay your electricity bill.
How does that work? Texas Energy buys electricity and competes in the market for the best price -- a competition that ultimately drives prices down and allows us to deliver more value for your money. In Texas, switching to a different electricity provider is kind of like changing to a different long distance company. When you switch to Spark Energy, the utility will continue to deliver electricity to your home but Spark Energy will handle all the billing, including the utility’s delivery fees and the electricity you actually use.
The local electric company is the utility – that’s the company who owns the infrastructure, including the poles and power lines that deliver electricity to your home. They are who you call if your power goes out or there's an emergency. But in almost every city in Texas, you must choose another company to supply that energy, called a Retail Electric Provider (REP). These REPs, like Spark Energy, allow you to choose electricity plans that offer competitive prices and plans to meet your needs.
Use fans instead of air conditioning. Circulation is important to using less air conditioning during the summer. Cool down the house early in the morning by placing a box fan in the window and opening up another window at the opposite end of the house, in addition to turning on ceiling fans. Box fans sit perfectly in most windows and help cool air come inside.
Summer is upon us! But that warm weather we’ve been waiting for all year also comes with substantial surges in our utility bills. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the average household in 2015 spent $405 on electricity during the summer. However, cooling down your home doesn’t have to result in jacking up your energy bill. There are a couple tricks and tips—requiring minimal effort—that will help you save on your energy bill while also helping to save the planet.
If you have fans in your house, use them. If you don't, considering installing a few. Fans can go a long way to cooling down a room and take up a lot of less energy than having your air conditioning on full blast. Having fans in your house allows you to program your thermostat up to 4 degrees higher because of the air circulation they provide. Make sure your fans are set to spin counterclockwise at higher speeds to save even more.
Replacing incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lightbulbs (CFLs) is one of the quickest, easiest ways to save money—and a place everyone can start. CFLs use about 75 percent less energy and last up to 10 times longer than incandescent bulbs. This can save you up to $35 in electric costs over the lifetime of each bulb. Switching to CFLs in the five most frequently used fixtures in your house will save about $60 per year, according to Energy Star.
Seventy-five percent of the electrical use by home electronics occurs when they’re turned off, according to the Department of Energy. These “energy vampires” suck electricity all day long—costing you an extra $100 each year. So if you’d like to keep that Ben Franklin in your wallet, unplug your electronics or plug them into a power strip, then turn off the strip.
This tiny little personal AC unit (and I do mean tiny) packs quite a punch considering its diminutive size. It measures just 7.24 by 8.54 by 8.14 inches, but boasts a cooling power of up to 1360 BTU, and claims to keep an area of about 43 square feet relatively cool. And while I was quite skeptical about what a cube the size of a large jewelry box could really do, I was, in a word, impressed.

Many utility companies have plans set up that offer discounts for switching some of your power usage to off-peak times. The hours and times differ slightly depending upon what part of the country you're in, and each plan is set up a little differently. If you're willing to shift a significant portion of your energy usage to outside the peak times, you certainly can save money.
I grill extra on the weekends, then reheat in the microwave during the week. Saves time and less heat in the house, but probably a toss up on electricity savings. Also, that extra basement or garage freezer will use less electricity the fuller you keep it. But use bags of ice to fill it so you don’t lose a fortune in food if the power is out for an extended period. Plus you won’t run out of ice when friends drop over. When you return from errands on really hot days, park your car in the drive for a couple hours to let it cool there instead of in your garage. use the delay timer on the dishwasher to run it at night. Plant trees to shade your outside AC unit if it is exposed to afternoon sun. Also helps reduce outside watering needs in other areas.
The electric power industry covers the generation, transmission, distribution and sale of electric power to the general public and industry. The commercial distribution of electric power started in 1882 when electricity was produced for electric lighting. In the 1880s and 1890s, growing economic and safety concerns lead to the regulation of the industry. Once an expensive novelty limited to the most densely populated areas, reliable and economical electric power has become an essential aspect for normal operation of all elements of developed economies.
Net metering is another billing mechanism that supports the development of renewable power generation, specifically, solar power. The mechanism credits solar energy system owners for the electricity their system adds to the grid. Residential customers with rooftop PV system will typically generate more electricity than their home consumes during daylight hours, so net metering is particularly advantageous. During this time where generation is greater than consumption, the home’s electricity meter will run backwards to provide a credit on the homeowner’s electricity bill.[3]
When you need an electrician in the Ashburn area, look no further than Kolb Electric! Our electrical contractors are highly trained and certified and can provide the best solution for the job, whether it’s new wiring installation, ceiling fan installation, or electrical inspections using infrared thermography. Contact us for any electrical services you need—call us today or fill out our online form!
The Texas Senate Bill 7, passed in 2002, gave 5.6 million Texans the power to choose a retail electric provider (REP) to supply electricity to their home or business. This bill facilitated a competitive energy marketplace that 85 percent of Texans can capitalize on today. Energy choice is available to residents in Houston, Dallas/Fort Worth as well as other cities in Texas.

Unfortunately, most of us keep things plugged in for hours or even days between the times we actually use them. This includes TVs, computers, DVD players, DVRs, Xbox and Playstation consoles, our air conditioning or heating (when we are out), toaster ovens, and much more. These things are then using electricity even when you are not using them. I’ve read that DVRs and gaming consoles are especially electricity needy even when not in use.

You can organize and shop by pricing at YOUR individual usage level, which allows you to shop and compare energy plans based on the rates you’ll actually see appear on your bill, inclusive of taxes and hidden fees. You won’t be misled by the “teaser rates” tied with higher usage levels that many homes never experience, as their usage level never reaches that pricing tier.
If you only use an electric water heater at certain times of the day, you’re wasting electricity keeping the water hot 24/7. To solve that problem, install an electronic timer switch (Photo 1; sold at home centers). Timers are available for 120- and 240-volt heaters. They can be programmed for daily or weekly schedules so you only heat the water when you need it. A timer can save you $25 per year.
Released November 06, 2018 | tags: CO2OECDOPECSTEOWTIalternative fuels+coalconsumption/demandcrude oildistillate fuelelectric generationelectricityemissionsenvironmentexports/importsforecasts/projectionsgasolineheating oilhydroelectricinventories/stocksliquid fuelsmonthlymost popularnatural gasnon-OPECnuclearoil/petroleumpetroleum productspricesproduction/supplyrenewablesspot pricestotal energy
It’s worth noting that you can switch for free with no exit fee 42-49 days before the end of your contract. Under Ofgem’s standards of conduct, energy firms have to give you between 42 and 49 days’ notice of your tariff ending. You can use this time to decide whether to stick with them, or switch. If you decide to switch, you won’t be charged an exit fee.
I too have a KillAWatt meter and was surprised at how efficient my new fridge is. Thing is, the old fridge that I replaced was not a huge energy user, so replacing a 20 year old fridge to save big bucks on energy usage is not going to happen. So, it pays to attack the big energy hogs first, like heating/AC unit efficiency, and managing heating and cooling loads thru attic insulation and ventilation.
Many homeowners are considering installing energy storage for their home not only as a source of backup power during grid outages, but also to combat time-of-use electricity rates during peak hours. With a backup battery, you can charge your battery during off-peak hours when electricity rates are at their cheapest, and then discharge and use electricity that has been stored in the battery during off-peak hours.
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